Your Mental Status While Jobless

June 13, 2011 at 12:51 pm | Posted in Health, unemployed | Leave a comment
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My earlier post mentioned the physical and psychological stress on the unemployed.
I’m a big believer in the word disease actually meaning dis-ease, a lack of ease.  That’s one reason, among several, that I’d like to pay close attention to the stressors of life now.  We need to keep our minds healthy to keep our bodies healthy.  It’s strange to think that most researchers and doctors don’t believe in this correlation.
Psychological stress is defined by JAMA as:

Psychological stress occurs when an individual perceives that environmental demands tax or exceed his or her adaptive capacity.

It’s normal to feel hurt, vulnerable, or angry after losing a job.  A lot of the feelings are in the same stages as grieving the loss of a loved one.  HelpGuide.org has some great tips on managing those feelings go over those tips here. I particularly liked these suggestions because it shows a step by step process with action, not just things to think about or meditate on.

Some feelings that are lasting for a while may seem foreign, but are actually very normal.  You’re supposed to feel exhausted, depressed, angry, or anxious.  Unemployment is a health hazard.  It’s a totally different state of mind for most people.  It’s dreary, repetitive, and it can be unhealthy.  It’s a cause of stress and a cause of anger.  The trick is not to let all of this get out of hand.  This file from the University of Georgia has a lot of positive tips:
Surviving Tough Times

One of my favorite tidbits of information comes from The Resiliency Center.  How wrong can it be if the first idea is to write about how you feel?  See if the skills presented help you: Resiliency Skills for Handling the Emotional Side of Job Loss and Job Search
These are just a few pages that helped me If you Google “psychological stress of unemployment” you’ll find pages and pages of information, pick what’s right for you.
Always remember that the world is too big for any of us to get through it alone. 

Let’s stick together.Finally if you get to the point where you are becoming too depressed or want to harm yourself there are always people to help you.

1-800-273-8255

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